July 23, 2021

What Controls the Movement of Wildfire Smoke? And a Perfect Forecast for the Next Week.

 We are now in wildfire season and the resulting smoke is on everyone's mind.  And the dramatic transcontinental movement of West Coast smoke has gotten national attention.

What controls the movement of wildfire smoke?   What conditions produce dense smoke in western Washington and Oregon?   How can smoke pass above us aloft, but our air quality remains good?

All of these questions will be answered in my new podcast.

And I start the podcast with the weather forecast, with our weather being near perfection in western Washington if you like clean air, sunny skies, no rain, and temperatures around 80F.

To hear the full story, listen to my podcast below or select your preferred streaming service



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5 comments:

  1. Have we had any measurable rain this July?

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  2. Thank you Cliff Mass for all the updates!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Officially?
    Not yet. Leaning towards probably no.

    There have been some localized some what ambitious drizzle in a few spots that probably clocked in with enough tally to be considered measurable. At SeaTac? Nope. It is borderline on cooking the books.

    Even if the drizzle counted, the region is well on track for the driest and hottest summer in Western Washington in modern times (or since some what accurate records where kept). 53 days with no "official" measurable rain is basically very attainable. Just have to hit mid-August with no rain at this point and the odds are in its favor. August is pretty much the month of misery with heat, smoke etc.


    ReplyDelete
  4. The answer is no...check out local TV news...they are keeping track of this potential record "lack of rain" situation It is considered a big deal...but we had a huge reserve snowpack last Spring, so there will be no impact concerning water shortages for Western Washington..

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm waiting for the Seattle Times headline "Perfect July weather impossible without global warming".

    ReplyDelete

Please make sure your comments are civil. Name calling and personal attacks are not appropriate.

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