Monday, September 30, 2013

Brief Post Mortem

There were branches and even some trees down on the Burke Gilman bike trail this morning...so I knew something had happened.   Here is a summary of the strongest winds over the past 24 hr.  Big winds (70-90 mph) at some exposed mountain locations (they call it Hurricane Ridge for a reason!). Lots of 30-45 mph gusts in the lowlands and 50-70 mph along the coast.


The 48-h total precipitation ending 11:48 PM last night from Seattle Rainwatch shows the big differences over the lowlands (this is not valid over the mountains or south of Olympia).  Some locations got to 5 inches or more.  And there was a well-defined rainshadow NE of the Olympics.


The forecast worked out quite well, both for precipitation and wind.  The air was quite unstable after the system went by and there are reports of a tornado at the Frederickson Boeing plant in Puyallup, Washington. (see pic)


11 comments:

Lindsey said...

Well, I'm not so sure that the NWS forecasters did that well. At 11:07 a.m., they upgraded the High Wind Watch to a High Wind Warning for 5 p.m. to 4 a.m. Then at 11:56 p.m., they downgraded it to a Wind Advisory, until 6 a.m. But then about 3 and 1/2 hours later, they cancelled even that. And my experience of a few hours of notable winds made it much ado about very little.

Believe me, I'm VERY happy it didn't materialize. But I wish that the NWS forecasters would have owned up to it a bit more in their subsequent weather discussions, explaining what actually happened compared to what they had predicted.

Travis said...

Interesting wind patterns yesterday. My anos only recorded a peak gust at 12.302 m/s (27 mph) here in Bothell. Other places really got blown about though!

rdale said...

Cliff - I'm 99.5% sure that's a picture of a train set. Did you tip that over to show us what might happen if a real train was in the path of a tornado? :)

Beth Niquette said...

We had a pretty stormy day and night here in the Mid-Willamette Valley. I was amazed there wasn't more coverage on the aftermath. Thanks for posting!

catman306 said...

The picture of box cars on their sides looks a whole lot like someone's HO gauge model railroad.

I'll bet you're just checking if people really look at your pictures.

Unknown said...

need like buttons! Like the train car comments :-)

ranknovice.com said...

I've got a meteorological question. Models, satellite imagery, and even some precip measurements show "streaky" precip maxima from this storm (and others like it). For instance, if you look at the WRF 4/3 km hourly precip, high precip is organized in stripes parallel with the windfield. The 24 totals for Victoria, BC and surroundings show a strong stripe-like orientation. These seem akin to rainbands in a hurricane, so I suspect embedded convection. What causes these formations?

humbert humbert said...

i'd say it's pretty good when they predict 1.94 inches of rain between 23:00 9/27 and 23:00 9/29, and the actual total ends up being 1.83 inches.

those are real rail cars! tornado in puyallup!

Joe said...

In the Mill Creek area it seems we were in a bit of a donut hole for much of the rain. No doubt it rained but generally seemed less than reported other places. The UW radar display seemed to show the classic convergent zone without heavy rain many times when other areas were hammered.

Boris Dzyubenko said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
dbostrom said...

"...you claim that there were very strong winds this weekend, when clearly there wasn't."

Boris, did you look at the regional map of recorded winds in Cliff's post? The numbers are real.

What was really remarkable about this past event was the regional smashing of rainfall records, going back to the beginning. Remarkable.