June 29, 2021

The Big Heat Post Mortem and the Next Few Days

 It's over.   

Throughout the region, all-time temperature records have been broken, if not smashed.   Just to name a few:

  • SeaTac hit 108F, beating the previous record of 103F.
  • Olympia reached 109F, exceeding the previous record of 105F
  • Quillayute, on the WA coast, zoomed to 110F, absolutely smashing the previous record of 99F
  • Portland hit 116F, incinerating the previous record of 107F.
  • In eastern Washington, Dallesport tied the all-time state record of 118F
  • East of I5, many locations in western Washington exceeded 110F yesterday.


Some High Temperatures Over the State, Click to Expand

Believe it or not.

Seattle now has a higher record maximum temperature than Miami, Atlanta, Washington DC,  or Chicago.  Portland's record high exceeded that of Houston, Austin, or San Diego.  

Over 50 observing sites in western Washington surged above 110F

You want record high temperatures?  Come to the Northwest!  

But we had not only had extreme heat....far beyond that observed over the past century... but also record-breaking cooling as a thin layer of marine air surged in last night.

  • Portland cooled by 52F (116 to 64) and Salem by 56F (117 to 61) in a matter of hours.
  • Seattle cooled by an impressive 46F!
  • Quillayute by 48F.

The visible satellite imagery this morning showed that marine clouds not only covered the coast but pushed inland around the Olympics.


The cooling west of the Cascades will be a two-step affair.  Last night's intrusion of cool, marine air was quite shallow.  The figure below shows temperature (red lines are temperature in C, wind barbs in black) above SeaTac Airport during the past day.  No cooling above 5000 ft.  But lots of cooling and a switch to southerly flow below 2500 ft.

What happens in this situation is that where there is sun at the surface, the air starts to mix, with the mixing getting deeper over time.  Eventually, we mix down the warm air above and temperatures surge.  You will notice that today---- sometime after 10 AM temperatures will warm rapidly into the upper 80s.  Sorry.

But the good news is that the marine air will push in again tonight as the thermal trough decidedly moves into eastern Washington...resulting in an additional temperature step down on Wednesday.  The ensemble forecasts for Seattle show this clearly (see below).  Good sleeping weather ahead!

Environmental Impacts of the Heat Wave

Air quality really took a hit, with increasing amounts of particles and ozone in the atmosphere, something that was evident by the increasing haze I am sure you observed.  Here in Seattle, small particles increased to moderate levels (42 micrograms per cubic meter) before plummeting last night.  (Figure below from Puget Sound Clean Air Agency)


Ozone is another issue and is actually worst not in the cities, but downwind in vegetated areas, such as the foothills of the Cascades.  Look at the ozone in Enumclaw, southeast of Seattle.  Progressively increased during the last week before dropping rapidly last night.



And there is the plant damage.  Yesterday's searing heat fried many plants, including native species, with leaves turning brown and discolored.  How many of you notice wilted and damaged vegetation?  The soil was not dry....it was the sheer heat that damaged the plants.



We Can Greatly Reduce Wildfire Risk

There is a lot of concern about regional wildfires.  My next blog will talk about how we can radically reduce the risk if our state leaders would act energetically.   First, immediately ban all private fireworks statewide, with serious penalties.  Second, effectively use weather forecasts for de-energizing powerlines in rural areas where wildfires could break out.  I will note that predicted dry conditions can be associated with a reduced lightning threat and lightning starts many of our major fires.

67 comments:

  1. This heat-event for Western WA was indeed a wild ride. Happy to exit the ride.

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  2. I heard a report that Maple Valley hit 118 yesterday. I was hoping for a little reflected glory with a tie for the state record. How's that for a town near the western foothills, on the cool, rainy side of the state, tying whatever forsaken, rattlesnake-infested tumbleweed patch set the record originally? But no news, no gold. I guess it wasn't official? Pity to come so close, without crossing the finish line.

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    1. Thats an over-estimate, I recorded 108 with my fully shaded thermometer in Renton and the temperature my car was reporting increased a few degrees as I drove further inland so I think there were a few pockets of 110 but probably not much above 110. 118 Did occur on the east side of the cascades where it was much drier Lytoon BC reported 121 today which is insane for a town above 50N.

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    2. Speaking as an inhabitant of a forsaken, rattlesnake-infested patch of tumbleweed, could you give a west-side address where I could drop off three cougars, a dozen coyotes, a breeding pair of wolves, and a black bear who loves garbage? Thanks!

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    3. I agree with your sentiment. I don’t understand why people west of the Cascades have to act so overtly condescending towards the dry side of the state.

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  3. Or... only allow fireworks in areas that are deemed safe and capable of mitigating fire risk. Wholesale banning is not a good way to get compliance; fireworks are too important to too many folks - its an expression of their freedom that you can't just take away, regardless of the "why". Clearly alcohol, drugs, and gun bans don't work, so let's be realistic in what we shoot for. Heck, even mask compliance was/is spotty.

    Absolutely enforce the appropriately scaled fireworks ban, have fire crews/aircraft on stand-by, and be prepared for whatever happens. My wildland FF boots are broke in and ready to go. Gonna be an interesting summer.

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    1. One person's freedom all too often ends up being another's tragedy.

      Look, we all get the "Freedom" thing. That certainly was pounded into our heads during the pandemic. All most people ask for is a bit of due diligence and taking a bit of responsibility. It gets very tiresome to hear "freedom" used as an excuse for acting the fool and being a sociopathic jerk. There would not be talk of bans if people would just stop and use their brains on occasion and perhaps be just a little less self centered.

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    2. No fireworks ban stands a chance without a buy-in from the native tribes that operate almost every fireworks stand. Without that, any ban will amount to one more example of impotent west side virtue-signaling of the kind that Seattle and Olympia specialize in.

      And I say that as someone who, in principle, would ban fireworks. But it simply will not happen without the tribes. Anyone whom observes the interaction (read: cash flows) between the tribes and WA State Democrats knows how unlikely this is.

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    3. You're right.

      A outright ban is an impossibility. However, there should not be a pass given just because of "freedom" oir some sense of guilt/reparations to the Natives. In the event someone in the neighborhood decides to be a bit lacking in common sense given the tinder dry conditions and launches a fireworks extravaganza that in turn burns down half the neighborhood, then they should be ready to face ALL civil and criminal liabilities. If you damage my property than no, I am not just going to shrug it off. You burned down my house but you were celebrating the 4th so its OK? Heh, sorry not happening! I am going to make sure you go as far up the river as possible.

      Perhaps the Natives should be forced to pay into a trust set up to compensate those who have their property damaged as a result of what they peddle. Or carry more insurance to indemnify those that suffer losses that are proven to be a direct result of their wares. That is a business cost to then be passed along. You want fireworks? Not liking the high cost? Thank those who were irresponsible with them.

      The Natives basically deal in bad habits (when they are not monopolizing fishing) that require moderation on the part of those who indulge in them. However, as a country we might just be too stupid to know when to cut ourselves off. Thus, the playground monitor has to intervene (The Gubmint).

      Decisions and consequences....

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  4. I don't understand why they still allow fireworks at all in the PNW, when the data clearly shows that the risks of wildfires being directly caused by incendiaries is much too big to ignore. But since they've hollowed out the police department here in Portland, the public has been told not to bother reporting fireworks that might cause serious damage, they're already overstretched with the riots occurring nightly. But what me, worry? Just forget about much of the entire state going up in flames last September.

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    1. I think it's time for people to organize on this issue and put pressure on elected officials to outlaw private fireworks with serious penalties for violations.

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    2. How many big fires were started by fireworks? Last I checked most of the recent fires were caused by lightning and powerlines falling on trees. I don't want to hear that fireworks are bad unless you have got data proving that fireworks started some large fires. Yes there is some risk with fireworks but they are a fun tradition for alot of families. They wouldn't be a family tradition if they were really dangerous. One of the reasons why I left California was they so many rules/restrictions life just wasn't that fun. I think unless something is very high risk we should have the freedom to choose whether or not to do it. I think if you handle fireworks responsibly, light them in the middle of street away from dry brush, don't stand next to them when they are going off and have a working garden hose/bucket nearby the risk is low and the millions of people who have had uneventful 4th of July's are proof of this. I think people should face a huge fine if they are doing stupid things like lighting firework in dry grass but there should not be a complete ban. Please don't be that one person that prevents most people from doing something they like, instead try to understand why so many people like fireworks. If you're determined to have that vote get ready to lose it.

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    3. Let’s just skip the little steps and demand an end to fire (in all forms) PERIOD. No forest fires, no more human CO2 emissions...
      End result? No more humans...
      Good solution guys.

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    4. Here are just two examples of catastrophic wildfires caused by fireworks here in my hometown - https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/05/22/613374984/judge-orders-boy-who-started-oregon-wildfire-to-pay-36-million-in-restitution

      https://www.portlandoregon.gov/fire/article/493378#:~:text=On%20July%204%2C%202020%20%E2%80%93%2018,Portland%20were%20caused%20by%20fireworks.&text=As%20reported%20by%20the%20Oregon,property%20loss%20and%20contents%20damage.

      This took me all of three minutes of searching, I can come up with hundreds more examples if you wish. But you don't appear to be someone who has experienced cognitive dissonance.

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    5. The 1902 Yacolt Burn, and the 2017 Eagle Creek fire, started in the same place, 115 years apart, from the same cause: kids and fire. In '02, the kids tried to burn out a hornet's nest, and the resulting fire killed 56 people and burned 500,000 acres. In '17, a kid threw fireworks into a dry canyon. Thanks to radically improved fire fighting, "only" 50,000 acres burned; no one died, but homes and businesses were destroyed.

      As for the future of fireworks, the only way to change that would be an agreement with the tribes that sell them. Given their importance in financing the Democratic machines that run WA and OR, I wouldn't worry if I were you.

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  5. That first graphic shows 101 as the high northwest of Bellingham. Reality for us in that general vicinity was 110. Didn't get below 70 overnight, either, but the lower temp & slight breeze is appreciated.

    The plant damage is significant. No amount of watering alleviated the scorching "sunburn" on quite a lot of my shrubs & bushes. Not sure if & when they'll recover.

    Could not agree with you more with the two suggestions for reducing wildfire risk. Unfortunately, I don't see banning of personal fireworks ever happening, for a variety of reasons.

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  6. Air quality (or at least visibility) is still poor it seems. From my location in Beacon Hill the Olympics are usually visible but today it's all haze and the mountains are totally washed out. On the plus side the cool breeze coming in to the house is amazing.

    I hope our friends on the east side of the Cascade Crest can find similar relief soon.

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  7. I noticed a distinct odor in my backyard while I frantically watered. I couldn’t place it at first but finally realized it smelled like cooking vegetables. My Davis weather station in the shade over turf peaked at 109F at 4:13 pm. . We’re out by Lake Sawyer close to Black Diamond.

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    1. I'm not far away from you in Remington (near Druid's Glen Golf Course) and my thermometer peaked out at 115.4. Ugly.

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    2. Same here. My Davis Vantage Vue peaked at 110F. Near Lake Holm a few miles west of you.

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  8. I agree with a fireworks ban in principle, but if this is going to be anything more than another round of pointless virtue signaling so typical of the west side, you'll have to get the tribes on board with a fireworks ban, or it will fail. Who do you think sells them?

    As for power lines, the key is the corridor underneath. It should be deforested for 150 feet on each side for high-voltage lines. This is the rule in my rural WA county. Unlike California, we don't have fires caused by power lines. Okay, one in the past 10 years, and it wasn't major.

    Rural grass fires are caused by morons with cigarettes (two of those in the Columbia Gorge last week), fireworks, and especially dry lightning. Shutting off power will do nothing about any of that. Same goes for forest fires, most of which begin with dry lightning in late August or early September, driven by easterlies and magnified by brain-dead (non)management of government forests.

    We are surrounded by private forests. There have been two massive forest fires near us within the past decade. One burned 55,000 acres and the other burned 45,000 acres. Both in unmanaged government forests. The private forests have had nothing like that, because the owners keep the understory down.

    If you want to solve a problem, the first step is to identify it.

    If you want to actually

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  9. One comment I would like to contribute is related to your previous statement that global warming (GW) is only a small contributor to the heat event in the last few days, because it only contributes +2F to this +35F deviation from normal. In your words, 94% (33/35) was from normal variability and the remaining 6% from GW.

    Consider a Gaussian probability distribution plot based on the temperature deviation from normal. A good example of such a plot was tweeted on June 27 by UW Atmospheric Sciences student @edwardsanthonyb. With this plot, your view is then that effects from GW should only be calculated on the x-axis – i.e., the additional change in the temperature deviation. But this is not very relevant when the general public wants to learn about the actual and/or increased probability that such extreme heat event occurs with GW – in other words, the change in the y-axis on the probability curve. Probability is also what you used to get attention by headlining your blog post on June 25 “A One-Hundred Year Heat Wave Event Comes Into Focus,” which is a statement of probability/frequency of occurrence.

    So, if the above-mentioned Gaussian distribution curve has shifted by +2F due to GW, the probability of a heat event at +35F would increase way more than 6% relative to the curve without GW. The absolute probability may still be low, but the relative increase due to GW is well above 6%. Here, the public would be interested to learn from your scientific modeling whether the frequency of a +35F heat event increases from “once every 100 years” to “once every ?? years” statistically. And, perhaps, the public’s interest should be seen as an inverse Gaussian distribution – attention rises exponentially near the extreme(s), but is very low when all is in normal range. That is how people of all stripes react. Just look at your plants that just fried up yesterday. Some of mine fried to a crisp as well with 117F despite irrigation. That’s what people experience.

    Therefore, the arguments that others have brought forth are not wrong. They are simply calculating GW effects at the y-axis and you’re calculating at the x-axis. This is all really basic Gaussian statistics that even a retired guy and weather novice in Klickitat County (me) can figure out. I hope you can as well, because it’s not that hard, really.

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  10. Clark County (SW WA) just banned the sale and use of personal fireworks for this year. I am hoping that common sense will continue into future years- even when it isn't 115 degrees the week before Independence Day.

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  11. First graphic shows a high of 101 northwest of Bellingham. Reality here for us was 110. Pretty brutal without A/C. And the plants...yep, major sun damage. Not sure if some will recover.

    Totally agree on reducing wildfire risk, but I don't see a day when public fireworks are banned across the board ~ and no way in heck would such a ban be enforced in many places.

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  12. It's misleading to conclude 'it's over'. It's actully only over for some. East of the Cascades, 110+ and record temps continue. The state all time record high may still be exceeded on Tuesday.

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  13. It is easy to find current temperatures and forecasts, but what is a good source for temperatures for days in the past?

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  14. We have some fried rhodies in the front (west facing side) of the house. Heat from the sun plus more reflected off the house was too much for them.

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  15. There are a lot of wonderful people still left in the USA but this country is becoming the poster child for the expression, "You can't outlaw stupid".

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  16. One good thing...you reported a couple months ago, that our reserve water supply (snowpack) in the Cascades was at 140%...I will not feel so guilty about turning on the sprinklers as the week progresses....three days of intense heat has already given my lawn a slightly brownish tint!

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  17. Our weather station recorded a peak of 108 on Monday, which is about 10-15 degrees warmer, and about a month and a half early. It followed an unseasonably cool spring. My truck thermometer showed 117 in The Dalles at 3:42 p.m., which is 10 degrees hotter than the hottest I've recorded there. Yes, very hot, but hardly an apocalypse.

    This is a big story mainly because the west side's natural temprature volatility is lower than it is east of the mountains. But not always. Keep this in mind: Those redwoods REQUIRE big fires to propagate -- by bursting their seed cones. Drive through the redwoods, and you will see the evidence of ancient fires.

    So yeah, it's a big event, truly a weatherman's dream come true. I'm no professor of meteorology, but I did earn an American history degree from a university whose department was ranked #4 in the U.S. at the time, and have retained a lifelong interest in the subject in many dimensions. A big event, but anyone who seriously studies this country's history, especially of the West, knows that this is quite far from unprecedented, regardless of any seeming confirmation by way of temperature readings that are spotty to begin with, and rarely go back even 150 years.

    Cliff, I salute you for a series of spot-on forecasts, and more generally for your scholarship and your courage in fighting back against the neo-Red Guards where you are. My critique is narrow, focusing on the "all time" stuff, which is factual in the sense of comparisons to the records we do have yet IMO somewhat misleading given the issues I have raised.

    A bit more humility is in order on the history. Other than that, keep up the great work. But listen to a supportive critic. If you think I'm wrong, say so and I'll listen to someone (you) out of respect for your ability and integrity.

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    1. Yes, it may have been warmer in the mid_Holocene, but its quite likely that its not been as warm as this event in the last several hundred years.

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    2. I completely agree with you. I believe this is something that we should expect to eventually happen...and it finally found its time to happen. I've wondered for a long time why it hasn't already occurred during the period of record. Of course no one could possibly know whether it's a "150-year event" or a "500+ year event." Certainly this combination of all the necessary ingredients coming together has always been possible. I'm just surprised it hasn't happened before now, even considering the climate change contribution. I'm not surprised that it happened.

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  18. Here in Portland my rhododendron and Japanese maple have lots of scorched leaves, but the dahlias and sunflowers held up remarkably well. I'm still in a bit of shock from what we've endured the past few days. I can't believe that I actually consider today's high (97 is forecast for PDX) a relief. Please tell me that we'll cruise through the rest of the summer in the 70s and 80s. Pretty please.

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  19. Brace yourselves for an insane 4th, people are ready to celebrate extra zealously with the end of the pandemic. It's going to be wild, I predict many many fires.

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  20. Really enjoy your blogs. As an Eastern Washington native, I discovered them back when I was stationed in Seattle with the Coast Guard. Now that I'm retired and back home, I'd love if you expanded the "reach" of your blog from Seattle and Portland to include Spokane. Thanks! Looking forward to your revised wx book!

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  21. Agree on getting rid of consumer fireworks and leaving it to the professionals.

    Regarding deenergizing lines, that is a tricky situation. We need to get to a point where we have better energy storage solutions at the local or residential level to alleviate the potential harms of deenergized transmission lines. Fortunately, excellent energy storage options exist at many levels of scale, and that technology is rapidly improving.

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    1. It is NOT "rapidly evolving." It is here, in the form of oil, natural gas, coal, uranium, and propane. I suspect that you've never priced it out. I have, and those lithium-ion batteries (Tesla "powerwall") are LAUGHABLY expensive. I think even a rich Seattle "progressive" would hesitate.

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    2. This retired electrical engineer would be very interested in learning more details about the “rapidly improving technology” you mention.

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    3. dregem, methinks Josh made it up. When we built a house in 2017, I was open minded about the alternatives. I did the deep dive on solar panels, home-scale wind turbines, solar hot water, geothermal heat pumps, and batteries if I were to get panels. I had two criteria: The stuff had to work, and it had to be cost effective.

      We wound up with an air-source heat pump with a propane backup, and a propane-powered on-demand water heater. By FAR the most ridiculously and laughably expensive idea was the batteries. "Outlandish" would be a mild word.

      Josh doesn't know what he's talking about, but I do. There's nothing like the prospect of writing checks to make someone look at the details. Josh, please tell us about the checks you've written. Thanks.

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  22. 90 degrees in N.Bend (feels like 94) so definitely not over for folks outside of Seattle. The air is also extremely hazy with NO2 according to the Windy forecast models. The City of North Bend put out a firework ban yesterday, I recall last year folks were shooting rockets from Rattlesnake Ledge & Mt Si on the fourth. https://northbendwa.gov/DocumentCenter/View/8196/06-28-2021-Executive-Order-Prohibiting-Discharge-of-Fireworks

    Cliff - can you do a Podcast feature about how heatwaves interact with pollutants/particulates to result in air quality issues and the hazards of each particulate? The Windy app separates out PM2.5 & NO2 but the local AQI publishes only PM2.5 data for public consumption.

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  23. Cliff - I hope you can, as promised, address any relationship between this "big heat" and climate change. There isn't much nuance in people's views on the topic right now, so some hard data would be helpful. Thanks!

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  24. The problem with "energizing powerlines in rural areas where wildfires could break out" is that those are the lines that cross Eastern Washington and the Cascade Mountains to supply the electric energy consumed by the Puget Sound area.

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    1. They'll never turn off the juice to themselves. Ever.

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  25. Our home is an urban farm in South Seattle. Fruit, veggies, and freezers full of contract Washington beef is our modus operandi. Yesterday reminded me of my youth in L.A. The temps and humidity were familiar, but the devastation on homegrown crops was traumatic. Cherries, scheduled for weekend harvest were withered by the time we could pluck them today (fruit leather this year). Lettuce, was scorched right through protective coverings. Tomatoes, usually hearty, even when the sun is brutal, withered under the extremes of transpiration.

    The farm will still produce a bountiful harvest (rhubarb leaves would put a bull elephant's ears to shame), but we plan on implementing failsafe strategies in the coming years. Another roll of Reemay cloth will go into storage, and greenhouse panels need to be removable (or hinged).

    The upshot and lesson here (and my question for Cliff Mass)...is it time to plant avocados in Seattle. I have two locations where our once massive Monkey Puzzle Tree stood (Fir Tree Disease). Sunset Gardening (Climate) Planting zones are shifting northwards. At age 64, do I play the fruit tree odds, and the agricultural uncertainties, to cultivate avocados in South Seattle.

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  26. Well... Seattle and Portland set all time temperature records- and so did a lot of small towns. At my house on the Mill Creek / Bothell line, however, it maxed out yesterday at about 104 or 105, which is about 2 degrees lower than the temperature reached at my location on July 29, 2009.

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    1. Time to replace the thermometer you bought at the Dollar Store twenty years ago, you think?

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  27. How about we ban driving Ford F250s to Costco, alone, for toilet paper?

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  28. On my property I noticed the mature doug firs,madronas, and red cedars appeared to get through the extended heat wave with no visible damage. Where I saw heat damage was on younger, less than 30 year old doug firs and western hemlocks. The damage was not limited to this years spring growth, the entire south side of these trees the needles have turned orange. Those needles will die and fall off, I am hoping these young trees will be able to recover from this.

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  29. Our flower baskets and tomatoes suffered, but the marijuana plants? Them things grow like two weeds. I'll replace the tomatoes tomorrow. LOL

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  30. I think a fireworks ban could work, with buy in from everyone. I think that people who are normally irritated by government overreach are fine with regulations when there is an urgent need. I was just meeting with some fairly conservative people in Yakima for work, and one of them said he's not shooting off fireworks this year because "I don't want to be THAT guy ... the one who burns down the neighborhood."

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  31. those without access to A/C or indoor space had it really bad yesterday. I can only dream of a fireworks ban. People perceive every limit on 'individual liberty' as the end of life as we know it, and explain away the people starting fires as bad apples, or stupid, when it is really a statistical problem. X people play with fireworks, and X people will start fires. Limit one to limit the other.

    With the fact a single individual can begin a devastating fire affecting millions of people, and then knowing that there are folks out there playing with fireworks or shooting cordite at this very moment, it becomes tough to not get angry.

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  32. A couple DOT stations hit 119 today N of Richland, as reported on the NWS site.

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  33. The temperature forecast for today seems to have been overshot. NWS predicted 91 F for North Seattle. I only observed a maximum of 88 F with a thermometer that is partially in the sun part of the day and 85 F with a thermometer that is in the shade. Both thermometers normally show a temperature higher than forecast but today it showed a cooler temperature. It could be because of the breeze that we had today? Right now, at 9:30 PM it's down to 74F.

    We survived without A/C. Not sure what the best solution is if you only need it 2-3 days of the year (every other year).

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    1. The solution is a heat pump.

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    2. OK, but we are in an apartment. Electrical heating.

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  34. Maybe the cost of buying out the fireworks (from the Native Americans, for example) is a lot less than fighting fires. But what are the stats on firework-caused forest fires, I wonder...

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  35. Do you know what our Wet Bulb Temp (WBGT) was on Sunday/Monday? I am just learning about this measurement and would like to know how high this hit.

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  36. Most of us know that temps above 100F are not at all unusual for Washington state. It's just that they usually stay east of the Cascades. What seems unusual this time is that the wind changed to pull that hot air over the mountains, which seems to be a fairly rare event. Is there any reason to think that rare wind pattern is going to become more common? Does it have anything at all to do with global warming, maybe not even directly in Western Washington but in how and where high and low pressure systems form over the Pacific and where they move over time? Of course a 35-degree temp change in a particular location is not directly related to global warming of 2 degrees, but one can wonder if changes in winds could cause Eastern Washington air to move into Western Washington more often.

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    1. East winds over the passes are not rare. They happen all the time. It is how we get temperatures in the high 80's and 90's in the summer. In the winter they are what cause high winds in North Bend and Enumclaw that blow down trees. The difference this time is the temperature of the air being blown across the mountains was already very hot due to the high pressure to the north of us and the 5000 foot subsidence of that air to the surface.

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  37. Kent reached 109.2, at the Mill Creek WUnderground station. It's currently noon, and still 68.

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  38. Does the higher than average SST (blob?) have anything to do with the extreme heat and humidity?

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  39. Beautiful day here--Wednesday--in Olympia. High was 72 degrees. We finished our ride from East Olympia to Rainier (the town) in the morning where the highest temperature we had was 66 degrees--perfect for cycling.

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  40. Cliff - I am confused. Seattle used to have a weather station at Lake Union; it was always much cooler than Seatac in summer, even before three runways with more concrete. I live in Fremont. My east-facing thermometer got up to 92/92/98 the hot three days; If Seatac were not the current reporting station, but we still had Lake Union, I bet Seattle would not have broken so many records. I find heat records not very comparable to old time records when taken in different places (now Seatac); and different amounts of trees and concrete.

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  41. Uh-Oh! What's with the pale sky and reddish sun? Not a fire already!

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  42. Cliff,
    Can you explain this temperature reading of 131 on Tuesday and 125 on Wednesday in Winona? The weather station to the north was significantly cooler at 115.
    https://www.wrh.noaa.gov/mesowest/timeseries.php?sid=E5129&num=72&banner=gmap&raw=0&w=325

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  43. This comment has been removed by the author.

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